Traditional Animal Processing Workshop

Understanding how to grow or raise one’s own food and how to process that food may soon be basic human skill again. One hundred or so years ago, more people were self-reliant when it came to providing food for the table. As industrial food production took over this process and created a dependence on the producers being the food supplier to the population, people lost these skills. More and more, people are seeing significant challenges in food quality and availability and are seeking out the skills to again be self-reliant when it comes to their food supply.

I started teaching Traditional Animal Processing in 2000 when I was an instructor for Boulder Outdoor Survival School. Over the past two decades, I have continually refined my process and my teaching methods.

The traditional Animal Processing Workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn to slaughter, skin, eviscerate, quarter, butcher and cook a medium sized animal (sheep or goat) in a traditional way, using little more than one’s knife.  The methods taught are what one would use to provide meat for a family, similar to methods used on a small farm or while hunting.

The workshop’s two primary goals are first to help people learn ways of being in more control of the food they eat by knowing how to process an animal for food and second to encourage respect for the lives given for food by showing ways of using more of the animal for a healthier diet and for utilitarian items. 

Whether you are a person who is living more simply and providing more for yourself or you are a hunter who has pondered what other gifts an animal provides, this workshop will provide you skills to use as much of an animal as possible.

The workshops includes how to:
1. Identify the parts of the animal
2. Cook the edible parts such as the muscles, organs, bones and more;
3. Process the hide, sinew, intestines, bones and hooves to be used for utility items: and
4. Make utility items including tools, glue, cordage, musical instruments, containers, adornments, clothing and more.

Workshop Formats

We present two different levels of animal processing workshops:

The Traditional Animal Processing Workshop 3-day Workshop is the primary workshop.  It  is guided by the instructors with detailed explanations of every step of the process.  After the instructor demonstrates a step the students share the completion of the step.  The students have ample time to experience the process and ask questions.  This is a three day workshop.

The Traditional Animal Processing 5-day Workshop starts with the curriculum of the standard workshop and is followed by the opportunity for the students to process an animal in small groups of four to six students.  The instructor is more a coach than a guide in this segment of the workshop.  The instructor is available to answer any questions and assist in the learning process, however the approach of this workshop is for the students to completely process an animal independently.   This is a practical workshop that gives the students an understanding and ownership of the process, which comes only from hands-on learning with time to explore the process.

Individual Instruction

                                                                                              

We often have requests to come to a farm and help process animals for individuals or a family.  These requests allow us to help folks process their animals and provide instruction simultaneously.  For these events, we will tailor the instruction to your interests.  Please contact us for more details and to discuss your interests.

                                                                                              

Starting the Experience

                                                                                              

Hosting and organizing a workshop is easy.  If you are interested in a workshop for your group or organization, please visit our Hosting a Workshop page.

                                                                                              

Workshops Provided

at

Skills Gatherings

                                                                                              

Florence, Arizona (South of Phoenix) ~~ February

Traditional Animal Processing Workshop
Annually, the week of Feb. 14th, at Wintercount Primitive Skills Gathering
Three day workshop.
For more details regarding Wintercount, please visit wintercountcamp.com.

Registration for this workshop is the first day of the gathering.   Please sign up early since the workshop typically reaches capacity very quickly.

Tabonia, Utah (East of Salt Lake) ~~ June

Traditional Animal Processing Workshop
Annually, the week third week of June, at Fire to Fire Gathering
Three day workshop.
For more details regarding Wintercount, please visit firetofire.com

Registration for this workshop is the first day of the gathering.   Please sign up early since the workshop typically reaches capacity very quickly.

Rexburg, Idaho ~~ September

Traditional Animal Processing Workshop
Annually, the week of Sept. 14 at the Rabbitstick Gathering
Three day workshop.
For more details regarding Rabbitstick, please visit the Backtracks site.

Registration for this workshop is the first day of the gathering.   Please sign up early since the workshop typically reaches capacity very quickly.

Boulder, Utah ~~ October

Traditional Animal Processing Workshop 
Annually the first or second weekend in October at the Harvest Festival
Two day workshop.
For more details or to register, please contact us.

1 Response to Traditional Animal Processing Workshop

  1. Pingback: Upcoming Event: Traditional Animal Processing Workshop — Edible Baja Arizona Magazine

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